July 2015

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Saturday, July 4 at
Closed for Independence Day.
Closed for Independence Day.
10am

MOCA will be closed Saturday, July 4 for Independence Day.

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Saturday, July 4 at MOCA Grand Avenue
Sturtevant: Double Trouble
Sturtevant: Double Trouble
Mar 20, 2015-Jul 27, 2015
213/621-1745 or education@moca.org

Sturtevant: Double Trouble is the first comprehensive survey in America of Sturtevant’s (American, b. 1924, d. 2014) 50-year career and the only institutional presentation of her work organized in the United States since 1973. Sturtevant has been “repeating” the works of her contemporaries since 1964, using some of the most iconic artworks of her generation as a source and catalyst for the exploration of originality, authorship, and the interior structures of art and image culture. Beginning with her versions of works by Jasper Johns and Andy Warhol, Sturtevant initially turned the visual logic of Pop art back on itself, uncomfortably probing at the workings of art history in real time. Her chameleon-like embrace of other artists’ art has also resulted in her being largely overlooked in the history of postwar American art. As a woman “repeating” the work of better-known male artists, she has passed almost unnoticed through the hierarchies of mid-century modernism and postmodernism. Sturtevant: Double Trouble is organized by The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 

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Saturday, July 4 at MOCA Grand Avenue
Kahlil Joseph: Double Conscience
Kahlil Joseph: Double Conscience
Mar 20, 2015-Aug 16, 2015
213/621-1745 or education@moca.org

Kahlil Joseph: Double Conscience is MOCA’s presentation of Kahlil Joseph’s m.A.A.d, a double screen projection that is a lush portrait of contemporary Los Angeles. The camera sinuously glides through predominantly African American neighborhoods, pausing to capture quotidian moments—driving in a car, a marching band, the barbershop—that are suffused with creativity, joy, and sadness. The split screen divides the viewer’s attention, and alludes to the history of auteur cinema which sacrificed linear narrative for experimentation with the formal and political possibilities of filmmaking. m.A.A.d extends this tradition of formal experimentation by crossing the wires of music videos, amateur film footage, and moments of magical realism. The two-part projection may also slyly evoke philosopher W.E.B. Dubois’s early twentieth century concept of “double consciousness,” a psychological description of Black life in America. The film’s verbally thick booming soundtrack, provided by hip-hop artist Kendrick Lamar, adds yet another layer to this prismatic account of contemporary life in Los Angeles.

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Saturday, July 4 at MOCA Pacific Design Center
Tongues Untied
Tongues Untied
Jun 6, 2015-Sep 13, 2015
213/621-1745 or education@moca.org

Titled after the landmark film by poet, activist, and artist Marlon Riggs, Tongues Untied presents a selection of works from MOCA's Permanent Collection by John Boskovich, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and others, alongside Riggs's deeply personal and lyrical exploration of black gay identity in the United States. Made during a historical period marked by the onset of the AIDS crisis, the works navigate desire, love, loss, and mourning to engage and question sexual and political repression, expression, and deviation. The exhibition is accompanied by a selection of archival materials related to MOCA's history of queer related programming during the plague years of the AIDS crisis. Tongues Untied is organized by MOCA Curatorial Assistant Rebecca Matalon and coincides with the 30th anniversary of the City of West Hollywood.

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